Questions and Answers

Healthy Minds Psychology Associates  //  Questions and Answers

The decision to seek psychological care is an important one. When faced with learning or behavior challenges in children, some parents choose to ‘wait it out’ and hope the concerns will abate with time, while others attempt to address issues on their own through behavior management strategies and/or tutoring. Parents frequently call into our office seeking some form of help for their child but are often uncertain as to where to start. We have prepared the following guide to help you determine if psychological testing or counseling is best for your child’s specific needs.

Testing and Evaluation Services

What is Therapy?


Therapy, also referred to as psychotherapy or counseling, is the process of meeting with a therapist to resolve problematic behaviors, feelings, thought processes, communication patterns, and relationship issues. Therapy can be done with individuals or within the context of a couples or family relationship. The relationship with your therapist is confidential, supportive, and collaborative. You will work with your therapist to establish goals for your sessions and determine the steps you will need to take in order to reach those goals. Through the therapeutic progress, you can begin to change unhelpful behaviors and habits, resolve painful feelings or trauma, manage emotions more effectively, and improve your relationships.




How long will I be in therapy?


The length of therapy can vary depending on your functioning, specific needs and individual circumstances. Some people initiate therapy due to a specific issue, and a short term, solution-focused therapy approach may be appropriate. Short-term therapy can last anywhere from six to eight sessions. However, some individuals enter therapy with concerns that are more significant, deep rooted, and require a longer time to explore and resolve. In these cases, therapy might last for a few months to several years.




What can I expect from the first therapy session?


Each therapist differs in their approach to the first session. Typically, your therapist will go over the confidential nature of the sessions and then spend some time getting to know you and the reasons that led you to therapy. In order to better understand you, the therapist may ask lots of questions about your childhood or family of origin, home life, relationships, psychological/medical history, current struggles, and your goals for treatment. It is common to feel somewhat nervous or even skeptical about therapy. However, as you begin to build a strong therapeutic relationship with your therapist, the process should feel safe, reassuring and non-judgmental. You should also use the first session to determine whether or not the therapist is ultimately a good fit for you.




What if I am not comfortable with the therapist recommended for me?


The relationship between you and your therapist can be a major factor in your ultimate success and growth during the therapeutic process. While it is often difficult to disclose personal information to others this may be even more difficult to do when you don’t feel comfortable or connected with your therapist. The good news is, you don’t have to like your therapist. The more comfortable you are the more effective therapy will be. If you find that you are uncomfortable with your therapist or their approach, one option is to simply tell him or her directly at the end of the session. If this would feel too awkward, you can inform our administrative staff that you don’t feel like it’s a good fit and we will explore your concerns and do our very best to refer you to a therapist who might be a better fit.





What is Therapy?


Therapy, also referred to as psychotherapy or counseling, is the process of meeting with a therapist to resolve problematic behaviors, feelings, thought processes, communication patterns, and relationship issues. Therapy can be done with individuals or within the context of a couples or family relationship. The relationship with your therapist is confidential, supportive, and collaborative. You will work with your therapist to establish goals for your sessions and determine the steps you will need to take in order to reach those goals. Through the therapeutic progress, you can begin to change unhelpful behaviors and habits, resolve painful feelings or trauma, manage emotions more effectively, and improve your relationships.




How long will I be in therapy?


The length of therapy can vary depending on your functioning, specific needs and individual circumstances. Some people initiate therapy due to a specific issue, and a short term, solution-focused therapy approach may be appropriate. Short-term therapy can last anywhere from six to eight sessions. However, some individuals enter therapy with concerns that are more significant, deep rooted, and require a longer time to explore and resolve. In these cases, therapy might last for a few months to several years.




What can I expect from the first therapy session?


Each therapist differs in their approach to the first session. Typically, your therapist will go over the confidential nature of the sessions and then spend some time getting to know you and the reasons that led you to therapy. In order to better understand you, the therapist may ask lots of questions about your childhood or family of origin, home life, relationships, psychological/medical history, current struggles, and your goals for treatment. It is common to feel somewhat nervous or even skeptical about therapy. However, as you begin to build a strong therapeutic relationship with your therapist, the process should feel safe, reassuring and non-judgmental. You should also use the first session to determine whether or not the therapist is ultimately a good fit for you.




What if I am not comfortable with the therapist recommended for me?


The relationship between you and your therapist can be a major factor in your ultimate success and growth during the therapeutic process. While it is often difficult to disclose personal information to others this may be even more difficult to do when you don’t feel comfortable or connected with your therapist. The good news is, you don’t have to like your therapist. The more comfortable you are the more effective therapy will be. If you find that you are uncomfortable with your therapist or their approach, one option is to simply tell him or her directly at the end of the session. If this would feel too awkward, you can inform our administrative staff that you don’t feel like it’s a good fit and we will explore your concerns and do our very best to refer you to a therapist who might be a better fit.





Counseling

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We strive to provide you with a superior experience here at Healthy Minds and this means selecting well-trained clinicians and ensuring the highest quality service to our patients. Our patient-centered approach is critical to our success and we pride ourselves on excellence in every form. 
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Healthy Minds Psychology Associates

Email:  Info@hmpsychology.com

Phone: 770-375-8124

Fax: 770-559-5543

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